Posts Tagged ‘Norumbega’

Leif Eriksson’s Quaint New England Inn

Sunday, October 4th, 2020


Last year I added a couple of posts to this floundering website about the everlasting heritage and influence of Norumbega in the state of Maine. The words “heritage” and “influence” are exaggerations, but there are a handful of fun landmarks and establishments in Vacationland that pay homage to the fabled Norse city that never was, such as Norumbega Parkway in Bangor, Norumbega Cidery in New Gloucester, and Norumbega Mountain in Acadia National Park. And now, more than a year since those exhilarating updates were posted (due to passivity and general slacking off), Norumbega Inn gets its own shot at the royal Scandinavian Aggression treatment!

In other words, check the photo of the sign above and the inn itself below.

The inn is located in Camden, Maine and was built in 1886 by a certain Joseph Stearns, who apparently invented the duplex telegraph and used his subsequent fortune to build his own castle, which became the inn and took its name from Leif Eriksson’s supposed municipal establishment further south in Massachusetts, of course. You can learn more about the inn’s history on its own website here, and more about Norumbega itself by clicking the image below.

Native Norse American Hard Cider

Saturday, August 17th, 2019

And the journey deep into the darkest…depths of Norumbega continues, with alcoholic apple-based beverages! What could be more enticing than that?

As my previous post so ineloquently explained, the myth, the legend, and the glory of Norumbega lives on in scattered locations and shape-shifting forms in the wilds of the state of Maine. Which, in a certain manner of thinking, actually kind of makes some sense, since Maine was basically once a colony of Massachusetts, which is the epicenter of Norumbega.

At any rate, this time the Norumbegan subject of focus is the Norumbega Cidery in New Gloucester, Maine. It is a quaint and lovely gård set at the edge of some dark woods that is working to bring traditional cider-making techniques back for modern Vinlandians to enjoy, including growing its own apples in its own orchard. And the cider is quite good, too. When I visited there were approximately half a dozen varieties available for sampling; the elderberry enhanced cider was a stand-out for me. They even have live music during their weekend tastings, which adds to the rural-rustic atmosphere and pairs extremely well with refreshing fruit-based beverages. It’s definitely a spot worth visiting, even if you’re not a geek of false New England Norse history.

So raise a horn and skål to Norumbega Cidery!